Newly Minted Tax Bill Likely a Positive for Apartment Industry

According to this article in the Wall Street Journal, the apartment industry fared better than the for-sale housing market with the tax bill just passed by Congress. From the article:

Affordable-housing developers, who had feared that provisions in the House bill would curb production in their industry by up to two-thirds, now predict the impact of the final legislation will be modest. Meanwhile, market-rate rental owners stand to benefit from a slightly lower corporate tax rate and increased demand for rental housing…

Apartment owners say they also could benefit from a tax code that no longer favors owners over renters now that the deduction for mortgage interest is blunted by a higher standard deduction

“John Q. Public has been sold by the home-building industry that it’s better to own than rent because you’re getting subsidized by the government because you have all these deductions,” said Ric Campo, chairman and chief executive of Camden Property Trust, a real-estate investment trust that invests in apartments. “That equation will change.” Mr. Campo estimates his typical tenant will pay about $1,500 less a year in taxes.

Barbara Byrne Denham, a senior economist at real-estate investment-research firm Reis Inc., said the tax bill could be a particular boon for rental markets in suburban areas with high property taxes. The bill caps the amount of state and local taxes that homeowners can deduct at $10,000, which could give some families an incentive to rent longer and enjoy the good schools and other services those areas provide without having to foot a higher tax bill.

Industry representatives also came out in support of the bill. The National Apartment Association (NAA) and National Multifamily Housing Council (NMHC) released the following statement:

“The National Multifamily Housing Council and the National Apartment Association applaud Congress on the passage of tax reform legislation and are pleased that the priorities of the apartment housing industry were largely addressed in the final bill. This legislation will help the multifamily industry meet growing demand to build 4.6 million new units by 2030. As the focus now changes to implementation, NMHC/NAA will continue to analyze and assess the impact of specific provisions on the multifamily industry.”

The Wall Street Journal article also looked at the impact the tax bill is expected to have on affordable housing development. While the changes are still expected to suppress new development slightly, it’s not expected to have the drastic effects that earlier versions of the bill would have created. The full article provides more background on the issue.