“Workforce” Apartments Gaining Investors’ Interest

High-end apartments have attracted most investment dollars during the almost 10-year bull run that began at the end of the Great Recession, but now more affordable units are getting attention from investors. From the Wall Street Journal:

A venture led by Prudential Financial Inc. is spending nearly $600 million for 4,000 housing units aimed at lower-income workers, the latest sign that investors see bigger gains in lower-rent apartments than in the upscale ones that have led the recovery.

These so-called workforce housing units usually are in older buildings that cater to price-conscious renters, paying about $1,000 a month for a one-bedroom unit. Around 6.3 million units, or about 41% of all the rental apartments in the U.S., fall into the workforce category, according to CoStar Group Inc., which tracks buildings that are five units and greater…

Workforce housing rents are increasing at a faster rate than upscale units because of high demand and the dearth of new supply. Meanwhile, most of the 100,000 units that become obsolete annually fall into the workforce and affordable category, according to a report set to be released by commercial real-estate-services firm CBRE Group Inc. later this week.

Mr. Munk, of PGIM, pointed out that investing in relatively small improvements to workforce housing units —like a new carpet or a washer and dryer—can produce a big payoff in a higher rent. “If we can spend $10,000 to improve a particular unit, that could potentially bring in $200 a month more in rent,” he said.