Tiny Co-Living?

Co-living has been a growing trend in rental housing for a few years now and tiny houses have been a thing for a while now too. Now it looks like tiny co-living is becoming a thing and the Wall Street Journal has the story:

But as the popularity of co-living has grown among young professionals over the past half-decade, the cost of those amenities and spending on new construction have made these living quarters less than cheap. Bedrooms in big cities typically start at more than $1,500 a month, pricing out nearly all except workers making at least $70,000 a year.

A few startups are hoping to change that with rents about half the price, making them affordable to workers in the service sector or artists and other creatives starting out.

Of the several startup companies pursuing this line of business, the one that really caught our eye was this one:

UP(st)ART’s properties are rich with amenities, including recording and photo studios, theaters and free acting, dance and music classes.

UP(st)ART compensates for the added costs by packing residents in like crew members on a cruise ship in 30-square-foot pods. They rent for about $750 a month.

Co-Living Not Just for Students Anymore

With the growing popularity of shared workspaces (think We-Work) it probably shouldn’t surprise anyone that shared living spaces are beginning to catch on. Of course, the student housing sector has been using this model for years, but in the market rate apartment world it hasn’t been seen until very recently. One issue is that local ordinances often prevent them, but as the affordable housing issue becomes more prevalent in virtually every city and town across the country, both housing providers and municipal leaders are looking for creative solutions and co-living looks like a good option. The Wall Street Journal recently ran an article that had some interesting data about this new housing approach:

This product, which is less than 10 years old and found primarily in large U.S. cities, represents only a tiny niche in the multibillion-dollar apartment industry. But developers are now preparing to build some of the largest new co-living properties in North America, a sign that the appeal of this type of housing could be broadening…

San Francisco-based co-living startup Starcity last week agreed to purchase a development site in downtown San Jose where it plans to build a 750-unit co-living building…

Rents at the company’s properties range from about $1,600 to $3,100 a month—not cheap but less than the average studio apartment rents in the Bay Area. Half of the rents at the new San Francisco property will be even further below market, affordable to people making as little as $35,000 a year, under new state legislation that streamlines the permitting process for projects with an affordable component.

“To tackle our affordability crisis we need both private sector solutions and public sector solutions,” said San Jose Mayor Sam Liccardo, referring to his city’s new co-living project.