500,000 Meals?!

Goal!

Friends, 24 hours ago we didn't think this was possible! It's been an amazing day with can counts and last-minute donations coming in – large and small. A very generous donation from a friend of PTAA and Second Harvest Food Bank of Northwest NC supporter put us over the top, and we've just kept going! We're not sharing the final number yet – donations continue to come in, and the website will be open for several more weeks – but we can say we've PASSED THE GOAL! The winner of the Clyde Fitzgerald Owner's Cup will be announced at the Diamond Awards next spring. Until then, more pictures to come from our incredible drive!

Posted by Piedmont Triad Apartment Association on Wednesday, July 31, 2019

Earlier this year PTAA’s Food Drive Committee set a crazy, audacious goal: raise enough food and money for Second Harvest Food Bank to provide 500,000 meals. Why’s that audacious? Because the 2018 goal was 225,000 meals! But, they would not be deterred and when then the drive kicked off on May 1 they were determined to meet that crazy milestone.

Well, we’re happy to report that around noon on July 31, the day that marked the official end of the food drive, we received an anonymous donation that put us over the top and we succeeded in meeting the 500,000 meal goal! Much credit and thanks are due to:

  • All of the PTAA member communities, management companies and supplier partners who enthusiastically participated in the drive.
  • The Food Drive Committee, co-chaired by Renee Phillips and Tyler Hunt, who did a great job organizing and recruiting volunteers for our food drive-related events.
  • All of PTAA’s Volunteers; especially those hardy souls who stood out in the heat to collect food for Fill the Stands With Cans.
  • The Greensboro Grasshoppers, High Point Rockers and Winston-Salem Dash who partnered with us for Fill the Stands With Cans.
  • WXII for also partnering with us by filming and airing promotional videos for the Fill the Stands With Cans games and by covering the games on their broadcasts.
  • PTAA’s staff who work hard throughout the year coordinating with Second Harvest and providing the Committee with the resources they need to do their thing.

I’m sure I forgot to thank some folks, so let me just end by saying, “Thank You! Thank You! Thank You!” to everyone who made this year’s Food Drive a tremendous success.

Now, if you’re reading this and still have food or money to donate, it’s not too late. Just contact Stephanie Beeman at PTAA (stephanie AT piedmonttaa.org) and she can help you out.

PTAA’s Food Drive Covered in UNITS Magazine

PTAA’s Annual Food Drive made the pages of the October, 2017 issue of UNITS Magazine. Below is a link to a scanned copy of the article and you can read the entire issue on NAA’s website at https://www.naahq.org/news-publications/units/october-2017

October 17 Units Article

Rent Jon for a Good Cause – Limited Time Offer

This year PTAA’s executive director Jon Lowder is once again trying to raise money for our annual summer food drive, and if you’re willing to donate to Second Harvest Food Bank of NWNC you can rent his time for any number of reasons. Even better, if you make the donation before June 30 then your money will be automatically matched dollar-for-dollar by an anonymous donor at Second Harvest, so it’s doubled! Not sure what you can do with his time? Well, here’s what he’s written to give you some ideas (you can find full details here):

Last year I ventured to raise money for Second Harvest Food Bank of NWNC by doing something called Jon’s Pentathlon of Pain. This year I’m focusing on raising funds in the month of June because Second Harvest has a program that matches every dollar donated until June 30.That means if you donate $10 it magically turns into $20.

So here’s how it’s going to work: if you have a challenge, task, stunt that you want me to do then send me a description of what you want me to do (see instructions below), and how much you’re willing to donate to Second Harvest to have me do it. Because time is short the project/stunt doesn’t have to be completed in June, but the donation does have to be made and we can arrange for it to be done later.

I reserve the right to not accept any challenge or project – I’m not getting piercings or tattoos folks – but I listen to any offer.

Here are some ideas:

  • Hire me for a day (I’m sure we can figure out something useful I can do)
  • A writing project
  • A podcast
  • An embarrassing video (here’s an example from last year)
  • Wear your company’s schwag (hat, shirt, etc.) for a day

Just use your imagination. To bid just send me an email or leave a comment on the Jon’s Challenge Facebook page.

Want to just make a straight donation? You can do it through my office’s food drive donation page here and just shoot me a message to let me know how much you donated.

Let’s get busy and help feed the hungry in our community!

Why We Continue to Drive for Food

As all of you (hopefully) know, PTAA has been running an annual food drive for Second Harvest Food Bank of NWNC every year for the past ten years. Each year we try to raise more food than the last, and that’s necessary because every year the number of people that Second Harvest and its partner agencies serve also grows. The High Point Enterprise ran a series of stories this week that vividly illustrate the severe hunger issues in our community. Here’s just a sample from the first story in the series:

After all, there’s a reason the city has more than 40 food pantries and/or soup kitchens working to alleviate hunger.

There’s a reason the local Salvation Army just introduced a mobile food pantry to visit the city’s seven food deserts.

There’s a reason Guilford County Schools continues looking for new ways to feed its students who aren’t getting enough to eat at home.

There’s a reason so many schools have backpack programs, in which a sponsoring organization — say, for example, the United Way or Backpack Beginnings — provides backpacks stuffed with food for students to take home and eat over the weekend.

The reason? People are hungry, and those people — the faces of hunger — are not necessarily who you think they are.
“The thing about hunger is, it’s not always the stereotype,” says Carl Vierling, a local hunger advocate who works for Open Door Ministries as the coordinator of the Community Resource Network. In that capacity, Vierling has examined High Point’s hunger crisis extensively and is trying to coordinate community efforts to effect change.

And some of the individual stories are nothing short of heartbreaking:

This past summer, Lisa Hawley took food to a woman she’d heard about who was struggling to feed her three high school-aged sons. Hawley introduced herself and said to the woman, “I’ve brought you some food — do you need help?”

“I do,” the woman replied, “but do you see those seven children walking down the street? There’s not one thing to eat in their house. You need to give them that food.”

Hawley tears up as she tells the story.

“That broke my heart,” she says. “She needed help, but she wanted to give the food to someone else who needed it more.”

On Monday, November 24 we will be dropping off a check for a little over $6,500 at Second Harvest. This is a portion of the online donations we’ve received as part of our Food Drive, but please don’t take this to mean that the drive is over. Our 2014 drive doesn’t end until the clock strikes midnight on New Year’s Eve and we ring in 2015. We’d like to take this opportunity to thank all of our members who have so enthusiastically participated to this point and to urge you to keep up the good work.

Here’s a link to the food drive page just in case you need it.

If you’d like to read the rest of the Enterprise stories you can find them here:

Faith Community Battles City’s Hunger Pains

Hunger Affects 25% of High Point Children

Backpack Programs Help Hungry Kids Get Through the Weekend

How Does High Point Resolve Its Hunger Crisis?